What Would You Do?

by Nancy Kay, DVM

A week ago I challenged you by asking, “What would you do?” pertaining to a series of pet-related symptoms. Thanks to the more than 100 of you who submitted your responses. All of your names were entered into the book drawing. And the lucky winner is…… drum roll…… Brenda Bass with Middle Tennessee Boxer Rescue. Congratulations Brenda!

Below, you will find my preferred responses to the scenarios I presented. Know that there is always room for differing opinions, particularly given your personal experience and what you know to be true for your own pets.

If ever you have doubt about how best to proceed in response to your pet’s symptoms, I strongly encourage you to solicit advice from a staff member at your family vet clinic or local emergency pet hospital. It is perfectly okay to have your pet examined on an emergency basis for something that ends up not being a true emergency. This happens all the time. Better to be safe than sorry, and your peace of mind will be well served.

Recommended Courses Of Action

For all of the symptoms described below, the options were:
  1. Do some “watchful waiting”.
  2. Call a staff member at your family veterinary clinic or local emergency hospital for advice.
  3. Schedule an appointment to have your pet examined by your family veterinarian.
  4. Take your pet immediately to your family vet clinic if they are open. Otherwise head to your local pet emergency hospital.

Now, here are the my preferred responses.

  1. It’s 8:00 at night and your pet just vomited some fluid mixed with food. He seems perfectly normal otherwise, and you know of nothing unusual that he might have eaten.
    For this scenario, I feel comfortable advising you to do some “watchful waiting”. This is based primarily on the other information provided (nothing toxic or unusual ingested, perfectly normal otherwise, vomited one time only). Should there be more vomiting or progression to other symptoms, veterinary attention is recommended. During the “waiting and watching” period following an episode of vomiting, it is typically a good idea to withhold food for six to eight hours while offering frequent access to small amounts of water. Left to their own devices, dogs who are feeling nauseated often “gorge” on water, prompting ongoing vomiting. When food is reintroduced, it is wise to offer small, frequent meals of bland diet (a mixture of nonfat cottage cheese and plain boiled white rice for dogs, and jarred turkey or chicken baby food for cats) for 12-24 hours. After this time period, if all is well, the normal diet can be reintroduced. Calling a staff member at your family veterinary clinic or local emergency hospital for advice is an option I would fully support here as well.

  2. For the past few weeks you’ve been needing to fill your pet’s water bowl more frequently than normal. Your pet seems completely normal otherwise.
    While this observation does not represent an emergency situation, it definitely warrants scheduling an appointment to have your pet examined by your family veterinarian. Increased thirst can be an early symptom of many disorders, some of which include: kidney disease, liver disease, urinary tract infection, and hormonal imbalances (diabetes mellitus, Cushing’s disease, Addison’s disease, diabetes insipidus). Your vet will be pleased if, before your appointment, you’ve measured your pet’s 24 hour water intake (ideally 2-3 day’s worth). Normal water intake is less than one ounce per pound of body weight per day.

  3. Your pet just had what looked like a seizure. The episode lasted approximately 30 seconds. He appeared completely normal both before and immediately following the seizure. He’s never done anything like this before, and you know of nothing unusual (toxic) he could have been exposed to.
    My preferred course of action is that you take your pet immediately to your family vet clinic if they are open. Otherwise head to your local pet emergency hospital. It can sometimes be difficult to know if what was observed was truly a seizure or a fainting episode (usually caused by heart disease). In either case, early intervention has the greatest potential to arrive at a diagnosis and favorably influence the outcome.

  4. Your normally very well house-trained dog or litterbox-trained cat has urinated two times on your bathroom rug. He seems completely normal otherwise.
    Whenever an undesirable behavior such as inappropriate urination develops, I always encourage giving your pet the “medical benefit of the doubt”. By this I mean ruling out an underlying medical problem rather than just assuming this is “bad behavior”. In this case, it is very possible that the urination on the bathroom rug is a symptom of a urinary tract infection, bladder stones, a sterile inflammatory process within the bladder (cats), a structural problem within the lower urinary tract, or a disease causing increased thirst, therefore increased urine production. Based on the symptoms described, my recommendation is to schedule an appointment to have your pet examined by your family veterinarian.

  5. Your pet suddenly appears more tired than usual, and his tongue seems pale. He seems completely normal otherwise.
    The pale tongue is the key here. It creates concern about heart failure, respiratory tract disease, a shocky condition, and severe anemia caused by internal bleeding or an autoimmune disorder. All of these possibilities represent true emergencies and I recommend taking your pet immediately to your family vet clinic if they are open. Otherwise head to your local pet emergency hospital.

  6. For the past week your pet has been eating his normal amount of food, but is nibbling throughout the day rather than consuming the entire meal in one sitting as he normally would. He seems completely normal otherwise.
    While it may be tempting to dismiss this change given that the total amount of food your pet is eating has not changed, my advice is that this symptom warrants scheduling an appointment to have your pet examined by your family veterinarian. Dogs and cats tend to be creatures of habit, and a break from their normal routine is a heads up that something is amiss. The change in food interest described here could be caused by something as simple as a painful tooth to something as serious as kidney failure.

  7. For the past two days your pet has has had a mild limp. Your thorough inspection of the leg did not identify anything abnormal. He seems completely normal otherwise.
    In this situation (note that I described the limp as mild) I feel very comfortable with “watchful waiting”. Just like us, our pets can experience bruises and sprains that will improve over the course of two to three days, particularly if exercise restriction is enforced. If, after a few days, the lameness is not improving or is worsening, it is time for a veterinary visit. Even if the cause of the lameness is something more sinister (a torn ligament, a bony tumor, etc.) the overall outcome will not have been negatively impacted by having delayed veterinary care by a few days. A word of warning- please do not give your pet any over-the-counter human anti-inflammatory medications (aspirin, ibuprofen, acetaminophen, etc.) during this waiting and watching period. Such products can cause far more harm than good.

  8. Your pet growled at you when you attempted to move him from the couch to the floor. This is something he’s never done before. He seems completely normal otherwise.
    In this situation I strongly encourage scheduling an appointment to have your pet examined by your family veterinarian. This will help rule out an underlying medical issue, such as a painful body part, as the cause of the growling. As described in number 4 above, your four-legged family member is deserving of your “medical benefit of the doubt”.

  9. Your normally ravenous pet showed no interest in his breakfast this morning. He seems completely normal otherwise.
    Our pets tend to be such creatures of habit, particularly around mealtime. When there is a sudden change in food bowl behavior, I am always concerned. While this situation does not raise any “emergency alarm bells” for me (based on the fact that everything else appears normal), I do thinkscheduling an appointment to have your pet examined by your family veterinarian makes good sense, with the caveat that the appointment be scheduled for sooner rather than later. Calling a staff member at your family veterinary clinic or local emergency hospital might be a reasonable option, but I am concerned that you may be advised to wait and watch. A sudden change in appetite has the potential to be associated with a serious underlying medical issue. Simply waiting and watching could sabotage a window of opportunity to create a good outcome.

  10. It’s bedtime and your pet is breathing heavily and doesn’t want to lie down. He seemed completely normal throughout the day.
    This is a worrisome scenario particularly if such behavior is truly out of character for your pet. While fear or anxiety can produce an abrupt onset of these symptoms, they can also be caused by a number of serious medical maladies some of which include: internal bleeding, heart failure, severe respiratory tract disease, or any underlying problem causing severe pain. This is definitely a “better to be safe than sorry” situation and I recommend taking your pet immediately to your family vet clinic if they are open. Otherwise head to your local pet emergency hospital.


How did you do? Do you agree with my recommendations? Are there other symptoms you would have liked me to include?

CREDIT:
Dr. Nancy Kay, DVM Diplomate, American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.
Recipient, American Animal Hospital Association 2009 Animal Welfare and Humane Ethics Award Recipient, 2009 Dog Writers Association of America Award for Best Blog Recipient, 2009 Eukanuba Canine Health Award

Author of Speaking for Spot: Be the Advocate Your Dog Needs to Live a Happy, Healthy, Longer Life
Website: http://speakingforspot.com
Spot’s Blog: "http://www.speakingforspot.com/blog
Email: dr.kay@speakingforspot.com
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